This video is the first part of a two-part series. I wanted to build this project for a very long time and finally did it. I think it was more than a year since I first had the idea.

Roundrects are everywhere
Roundrects are everywhere
Floating base
Floating base
All the parts
All the parts

Starting with the project, I had an initial idea how the stand should look. However, when I started with cutting the wood, for the base, I fought about using some roundrects instead of plain squares to give the stand some flair. Moreover, as I already needed the router for making the space for all the electronics, I decided to add a chamfer at the bottom to make it optically smaller and achieve a hover effect. I am glad that I did this, it was by far my best decision in the project.

In the cavity of the base, I install a USB hub a sound card and an old mouse. The reason for the mouse is that this is the simplest way of getting additional input to a computer and I wanted to have two buttons on the stand. One button is used to toggle between play and pause. The other button toggles the audio output device on the computer, enabling me to switch between the speakers and the headphones. The second part shows more details about this.

Fitting the usb connector
Fitting the usb connector
Detail view of the usb connector
Detail view of the usb connector
Fitting the mouse
Fitting the mouse

This project involved quite a lot of routing and dry fitting to get the parts to fit in the holes. I did underestimate the time it needs to get everything into the base, so this project took a lot longer than initially planned. It was well worth the time.

I could not and did not want to use the original buttons of the mouse, so need to find a solution which looks good. After some experimenting, I found a simple way to use. In this project, I could apply this technic now in this project for the first time. I use a short part of a dowel and glue a washer, which is has a slightly larger diameter than the rod to the bottom of the rod.

Drilling the pilot hole
Drilling the pilot hole
Drilling the cavity for the button
Drilling the cavity for the button
The finished hole for the button
The finished hole for the button

I drilled the hole in the base with a smaller drill from the top (the same width as the rod), and a larger diameter from the bottom. This way the rod with the washer cannot fall out. The actual switch is mounted on a small piece of wood which will be shown in the second part.