Building a wooden hammock stand

This summer I finally build a stand for my hammock I’ve created in school more than twenty years ago. As we do not have trees in our garden I was unable to use the hammock for the most time. I’ve seen some designs for hammock stands around the internet but when searching the parts for these, most would have gotten way too expensive. So I sketched my own version with the material I have available locally.

Gluing the posts

To create the central pillar I’ve chosen to double the strength of the material by gluing two planks together. It gives the post the necessary rigidity to support the weight of the person in the hammock.

The post boards
The post boards
One of the post glued
One of the post glued
Cleaning the squeeze out
Cleaning the squeeze out

Preparing the ground board Each of the ground board needs to receive a spacer on the ends. This spacer helps to define the correct positioning when assembling the stand later on.

Drilling screw holes

In winter I want to deconstruct the stand for storage. That means the main parts need to connect via screws. On each end, I drill two holes for screwing the platform together.

Post assembly
Post assembly
Setting the angle for the post
Setting the angle for the post
Drilling the holes
Drilling the holes

Foot construction and assembly

The stand has two feet which help to keep it upright. Each foot consists of a board and two braces which are cut diagonal to reduce the weight. Afterward, I glued the props to the footboard. And short dowels support the glue joint. I did not want to use screws in this case as it is on the bottom side and could get wet.

Constructing the first foot
Constructing the first foot
Installing the braces on the feet
Installing the braces on the feet
Brace detail
Brace detail

The feet are attached to the baseboard via two notches cut into the upper side of each board. A short length of wood spans across the gap and a screw can be added to connect to the feet. The notch prevents the feet from sliding around and defines the correct location when assembling the stand. The foot connection was my most significant problem point in the whole construction of the project. I did not solve this issue while designing the stand, as I could not find a good solution on the computer. I needed to address this issue after I’ve built both feet. The solution I’ve obtained in the end worked good and is also simple.

Notching the post for the rope

The notch is responsible for keeping the cord in the correct location. Originally I planned on using metal hardware to connect the hammock to the stand. But I could not find anything, which I trusted, in my local hardware store. After the notch, it is guided through a hole on the back side of the post. And a knot holds its there. Simple and it works. And it also reduced cost as no additional hardware was bought.

Cutting the screws

The stand holds together by M10 screws, as I needed multiple screws of quite some length I decided to cut them from a threaded rod. It worked quite well, but for the next time, I need to make the drilled holes a bit bigger as they are quite tight.

Sanding

Each part was sanded to 180 grid to be ready for finishing. As always I should spend more time on this job and not rush it, as I found quite some places where more sanding was necessary.

Testfiting for the hammock
Testfiting for the hammock
The sanded feet
The sanded feet
The painted parts
The painted parts

Applying the finish

To finish the project I administered three layers of finish onto each part. The first layer was a base coat needed for wood with a lot of natural resin. After this, I’ve added two layers of an exterior wood paint. The paint makes the wood weather resistant, but I do not plan on keeping the stand in the rain.

Assembly time

Time to assemble the stand! All the parts are ready and screwed together. I know that the hammock-stand works as I already had it joined once before the paint went on. But this was the first time that I used the correct rope I bought for this project. All went fine the rope fit, and the hammock hangs successfully in the middle of the stand.

The assembled stand
The assembled stand
Another view of the finished stand
Another view of the finished stand
Detail of the rope
Detail of the rope

The project was a success. The stand was undoubtedly more expensive then if I bought one but I would miss all the experiences of building one :-) My design worked fine, there is a bit of a wobble in it, and you should not use it to swing on it. But I can always add additional ropes from the post to the foot to give it some more rigidity in this way.